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        In a world full of gimmicks, “quick fixes,” and advertisements of the latest and greatest technology, it’s no wonder the general population is confused about health care and what being healthy means. Our society is inundated with marketing schemes claiming one pill will help you lose weight and one medication will be the easy fix to whatever disease you may be suffering from. Let’s start with a simple question asking, “what is good health?” or more specifically, “what does being in good health mean to you?” Most people would answer that question stating, good health means being free of disease and sickness. But what if being healthy could mean something more than just the absence of disease. What if good health included, not just a disease-free state, but also, a state of thriving wellness.

        How many times have you heard someone be content with his or her health just the way it is? Too often, I hear patients say “I have knee pain” or “I suffer from headaches” and they accept that as the way of life for themselves. They accept that they are just someone who suffers from knee pain, headaches, etc and that is how they have to live their life. I am here to say that is not how your life has to be lived and that is not a state of good health and wellness. Living a life of wellness starts in the mind with the acceptance that every one of us has the opportunity to live to our full health potential. I used to be “one of those” that was content with being someone who happened to suffer from headaches. I accepted everything I heard on TV or in the media to be true and did not challenge the concepts for myself. Attending chiropractic school infinitely changed my way of thinking for the better. I learned about the importance of disease prevention, maintenance of particular health and musculoskeletal conditions, and the importance of living a healthy lifestyle. I currently continue to receive regular chiropractic treatment, which has reduced my headaches from 3-4 headaches a week to one headache every few months to a year.

        The message I would like to convey is to anyone living in pain, whatever that pain may be. He or she does not have to be living that way. I would like to pose a challenge to every individual reading this article to stop being content with his or her aches and pains and to begin on the path to a life of health and wellness. 

                                                                   Yours in Health, 

                                                                   Dr. Kelly (Supple) Cornell